Alzheimer's care

Alzheimer’s Care Guide: Symptoms, Stages, Prevention, and Treatment

Kelsey Davis Caregiver, Fitness & Health, Medicare, Medicare Advantage

There are more than 5.7 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s. This number is expected to reach 14 million by 2050. The complications from this disease make Alzheimer’s the sixth leading cause of death in the United States, so it’s important to educate yourself on the symptoms, signs, stages, prevention, and treatment.

Difference Between Alzheimer’s and Dementia

Dementia is a syndrome and used to describe symptoms that include memory loss, difficulty problem solving, and struggling with thoughts and language. Alzheimer’s is a disease and is a type of dementia. In fact, there are over 100 types of dementia. Some forms of dementia can be temporary, reversed, or cured, however, Alzheimer’s disease cannot.

Alzheimer’s Symptoms and Stages

Alzheimer’s can cause changes in the brain long before any symptoms or signs start to show. Understanding the symptoms can help you detect Alzheimer’s early on and increase your chance of benefiting from treatment.

The risk of developing Alzheimer’s will vary per individual, but the following are the largest risk factors.

Age: Alzheimer’s is not a normal part of aging, however, your risk increases with age. Most people with Alzheimer’s are diagnosed after the age of 65. After 65, your risk doubles every five years.

Family History: If your parent or sibling was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, you are more likely to develop the disease. This risk increases with the number of diagnosed family members.

Other Risks: There is a strong connection between our hearts and brain. If you have heart disease, are overweight, or lack regular exercise, you’re at a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s.

What are the very first signs of Alzheimer’s?

Alzheimer’s is a slow progressing brain disease. If you notice any of the following warning signs, contact your doctor:

  • Forgetting recently learned information (dates, appointments, events, etc.)
  • Trouble following a recipe
  • Difficulty driving to a familiar location
  • Losing track of dates, seasons, and times
  • Difficulty reading
  • Trouble judging distances
  • Struggling with vocabulary
  • Misplacing things around the home
  • Paying less attention to hygiene needs
  • Avoiding social activities
  • Changing personality

What are the 7 stages of Alzheimer’s?

There are three general stages of Alzheimer’s – mild (early stage), moderate (middle stage), and severe (late stage). However, these stages can be broken down into seven more specific stages. Keep in mind that the seven stages can overlap, and placing someone into a specific stage can be difficult.

Stage 1 – No Impairment: Alzheimer’s is not detectable in this stage. There are no signs of memory problems or other symptoms.

Stage 2 – Very Mild Decline: Minor memory problems may begin to surface. You would still perform well on memory tests, and Alzheimer’s will be difficult to detect.

Stage 3 – Mild Decline: At this stage, you or family members may start to notice small symptoms. Memory tests may be affected and doctors can detect impaired function. Someone in this stage may be unable to find the right words in conversation or remember new names.

Stage 4 – Moderate Decline: This stage is much more clear-cut. Someone in this stage may have difficulty with basic math problems, have short-term memory loss, be unable to manage bills, and may forget details of the past.

Stage 5 – Moderately Severe Decline: Those in this stage may begin to require assistance in day-to-day life. They may be unable to get dressed appropriately, be unable to recall details like their phone number, and demonstrate significant confusion.

Stage 6 – Severe Decline: People in this stage need constant supervision and may require professional care. They may be unaware of their environment, unable to recognize faces, and unable to remember most of their personal history. Loss of bladder control, personality changes, and wandering are also common in this stage.

Stage 7 – Very Severe Decline: This is the final stage of Alzheimer’s. People at this stage are unable to communicate and respond to their environment. Their speech may be limited to less than six words and they are unable to sit up independently.

How quickly does Alzheimer’s progress?

The rate that Alzheimer’s symptoms progress can vary, but the average person lives four to eight years after diagnosis. However, early detection and a healthy lifestyle can help someone with Alzheimer’s live 20+ years after diagnosis.

Alzheimer’s Test

There is no single test that can diagnose someone with Alzheimer’s. Doctors use a combination of medical history, physical exams, neurological exams, mental status tests, and brain imaging when diagnosing. Neurological exams address reflexes, coordination, eye movement, speech, and sensation. Mental status tests give an overall sense if a person is able to understand dates, times, locations, and simple instructions or calculations.

Alzheimer’s Prevention

Complex factors like age, genetics, environment, lifestyle, and existing medical conditions play a role in developing Alzheimer’s. However, while you can’t change your genes or your age, there are plenty of steps you can take to help prevent Alzheimer’s.

Can Alzheimer’s be prevented?

There is strong evidence that shows changing your lifestyle promotes a healthy heart and lowers your risk of Alzheimer’s.

Prevention tips include:

Healthy Heart: There are several connections between our heart and brain. Studies have shown that about 80% of people with Alzheimer’s also have some form of heart disease. Manage your blood pressure, diabetes, and cholesterol levels to lower the risk of developing any heart conditions.

Exercise and Diet: Regular exercise and a healthy diet directly benefit your brain cells. Exercise increases blood flow and oxygen to the brain and a healthy diet limits your intake on sugars and saturated fats.

Social Activities: Staying social helps build and maintain strong connections. This can keep you mentally active. Researchers believe these connections can lower your risk of Alzheimer’s by increasing mental stimulation and reinforcing connections between nerve cells and your brain.

Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment

There is no cure for Alzheimer’s and no way to stop its progression. However, there are drug and non-drug options to help treat the symptoms. These include:

Medications for Memory: Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine are common drugs used to treat memory loss and confusion. A doctor can prescribe these medications, so be sure to contact your health care provider.

Behavior Treatments: Some doctors may prescribe antidepressants, anxiolytics, or antipsychotic medications in people who express drastic behavior.

Alternative Treatments: Researchers believe that herbal remedies, dietary supplements, and certain foods can enhance memory and prevent Alzheimer’s. Some examples include coconut oil, coral calcium, and omega-3 fatty acids. To see an extended list, click here.

Alzheimer’s Care

Are you a caregiver? There are several options available to help a loved one diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. These options include:

Minor Assistance:  You can help your loved one with simple tasks like removing objects that could cause injury, maintaining smoke alarms and fire extinguishers, and keeping dark areas, like stairwells, well lit.

Home Care:  Home health services and adult day centers are two options that can help with more intensive health and well-being tasks, while still living in the home.

Residential Care:  Residential care is common in the later stages of Alzheimer’s. Residential care can include assisted living, nursing homes, and Alzheimer’s special care units. These options can help with tasks like meal preparation, dressing, bathing, and other everyday tasks.

Alzheimer's care

Role of Medicare and Alzheimer’s

Original Medicare (Parts A and B) cover inpatient hospital care and some doctor’s fees associated with Alzheimer’s. Plus, Medicare will pay up to 100 days of skilled nursing home care in certain circumstances. Long-term custodial care, like nursing homes, is not covered. Medicare will pay for hospice care in-home or at a hospice facility.

Medicare Advantage plans are great options for coverage beyond Original Medicare.

Some people with Alzheimer’s may be eligible for a Medicare Special Needs Plan. SNPs are a different type of Medicare Advantage plan and generally provide coverage for doctor visits, hospital services, and prescription drugs. Some of these plans can coordinate care services to help you better understand your condition and your doctor’s plan. If you qualify for a Medicare Special Needs plan, you may also qualify for a Special Enrollment Period. This means you can enroll or change Medicare plans throughout the year!

If you have any questions about Medicare Special Needs Plans or Special Enrollments Periods do not hesitate to contact us. Our licensed agents are contracted with all the major carriers across 38 states and can help you enroll in a plan that fits your needs and budget. To schedule a no-cost, no-obligation appointment, click here or call us at 833-438-3676.